Category Archives: terrorist registry

Islamic State Supporter Amer Alhaggagi Sentenced to 15 Years in Prison

posted by Christopher W. Holton

This is yet another example of the inadequacy of the U.S. criminal justice system for dealing with Jihad.

Amer Alhaggagi of California was an admitted Islamic State “supporter.” He set up Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus/Gmail accounts for other Islamic State supporters and posted terroristic threats online.

He even identified targets for an Islamic State member who turned out to be an undercover federal agent.

In the process of all this, he also ran an identity theft operation.

For all this he has been sentenced to just over 15 years in prison. Alhaggagi is 23 years old. When his assigned sentence ends, he will be 38 years old. But the reality is that he will be released sooner than 15 years if he behaves himself in prison.

So we have to HOPE that when he does get out of prison, he will have turned into a peaceful, patriotic American. Excuse me for being skeptical. Given the level of Jihadi activity in America’s prisons, it is just as likely that Alhaggagi will emerge from prison even more devout.

This is part of a wider pattern. According to the George Washington University Program on Extremism, 123 Islamic State members or supporters in America have been convicted of various crimes over the past few years.

The average sentence for these convicts was 13.5 years. And it is highly likely that these people will NOT serve their entire sentences.

America needs to overhaul its sentences for terrorist-related offenses and it desperately needs a terrorist offender registry modeled after the sex offender registry that has worked successfully for decades.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/california-isis-supporter-who-bragged-of-bomb-plots-gets-more-than-15-years-in-prison

The Case for a Terrorist Registry in America

 

by Christopher W Holton

Since the 1990s sex offenders in America have been required to register with their local sheriff so that law enforcement can be aware of their residence.

This program has worked very well.

The time has come for a similar registry for those offenders who have been convicted of terrorism offenses.

If someone who has been convicted on terrorism charges or material support for terrorism charges moves into your community, don’t you want your local law enforcement authorities to know about it?

This scenario is not as far-fetched as you might think.

As the Associated Press reported back in August, dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are due to be released in the coming years.

https://apnews.com/0d08df6f540f4dc291314396534fcf31/Should-springing-of-US-terrorism-convicts-alarm-Americans?&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axiosam&stream=top-stories

Almost all of these convicts are individuals involved with Islamic jihad who were convicted since the September 11th terrorist attacks.

You’d be shocked at how lenient the federal sentences for terrorism and material support for terrorism are. For instance, the subject interviewed for the AP article is a guy named Ismail Royer (formerly Randall Todd Royer). He was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison back in 2004, but you’ll notice that he is now already a free man working for a think tank in Washington DC.

Royer claims that he is a good guy and the Washington Post did a fluff piece on him claiming he is now fighting “radical Islam.”

Excuse me if I am more than a little skeptical. As far as I am concerned, a Jihadi who has been convicted on terrorism-related charges will always be a Jihadi where our safety is concerned.

Ismail Royer should have to check in with the local sheriff where ever he lives. He should have to register as a convicted terrorist just like a sex offender has to register with the sheriff.

I guess Royer will maintain that he learned his lesson while in prison and is no longer a threat to society.

But there is ample evidence to indicate that what goes on in prisons could just as easily encourage Jihadis to stay Jihadis and network with other Jihadis.

Take for example Ahmad Khan Rahimi who was convicted in the bombings in New York and New Jersey in September 2016.

Since he has been in prison, Rahimi has “provided inmates with copies of terrorist propaganda and jihadist materials, including speeches by Osama Bin Laden and the late militant cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, bomb making instructions, books on jihad and issues of the al Qaeda-backed magazine Inspire…”

http://myfox8.com/2017/12/24/man-convicted-in-2016-bombing-in-new-york-that-injured-30-people-is-trying-to-radicalize-other-inmates-and-is-currently-on-a-hunger-strike/

Now, Rahimi is unlikely to ever see the outside of a prison again, but the point here is that he is an example of how the Jihadists have used our prisons to recruit and proselytize for years.

What that means is that a person sent to prison on material support for terrorism charges for sending a few thousand dollars to Al Shabaab, HAMAS, Hezbollah, ISIS or Al Qaeda may very well emerge in a few years a more hardened Jihadi than he was when he entered prison.

That’s why legislation will be introduced in several states in 2018 to require terrorist convicts to register with their local sheriff in much the same way that sex offenders have done for decades.

 

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